University of St Andrews
 
 

School of Biology News Centre

item 111
[28-07-2008 to 29-08-2008]


News Item:
New infectious disease lab opens

A new state-of-the-art facility for investigating the cause of a range of infectious diseases has opened at the University of St Andrews.

The new labs, built at a cost of nearly £1M, will be used for fundamental research into both established and newly emerging viral and parasitic diseases such as influenza and sleeping sickness. In addition, a major injection of £1.25M just awarded from the Medical Research Council (MRC) will fund investigation into hantaviruses, a group of potentially deadly viruses passed onto humans by rodents.

The work of the lab will be directed by Professor of Virology at the University, Richard Elliott. He said, "The establishment of the containment labs at St Andrews signals the University's commitment to the study of virology, and these labs are not just a first for St Andrews, but a first for Fife."

see here for further details
contact: Prof Richard Elliott


 

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Upcoming Events
  • Looking at telemetry data from above and below: some technological and methodological thoughts of an animal movement ecologist
    speaker: Dr Theoni Photopoulou (University of Cape Town)

    building: SOI
    room: Lecture Theatre
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Dr Emma Defew

    Telemetry (the remote collection of data via communications systems) allows us to study animals that we would otherwise be unable to observe, in environments we don't have easy access to. The collection of such data is racing ahead of the analytical techniques we have available to understand the data and the systems under study. The type of information we can or should collect both determines, and is determined by, the questions we are able to address regarding the ecology, life-history and behaviour of animals. Challenging systems are often the most interesting, and sometimes the most important to study, but they present us with special practical and analytical challenges. Even though we now have the capacity to collect data in more detail and greater quantities than ever before, we often still have to make do with whatever we can get, or conversely, end up with data in large volumes or with more complexity than we know how to analyse. I will present examples of the data types and study systems I work with, including seals and black eagles, the importance of knowing how data are collected, and some of the methods I use to try to get the most out of these data.


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  • Keynote Speech: International Environmental Omics Synthesis Conference: Genomics and Inheritance
    speaker: Professor Elizabeth A. Thompson (University of Washington, School of Statistics)

    building: MBS
    room: Lecture Theatre
    see also: additional details
    host/contact: Prof Thomas Meagher

    More details about the 4-day International Environmental Omics Synthesis Conference in St Andrews, as well as speakers and programme, can be found on the iEOS web site.

    Genetic diversity in a species is key to its success in a changing environment, and a key determinant of genetic diversity is the ancestral history of the population.  Classically such ancestral structure was considered in terms of population demography and pedigree-based relationships.  Analyses were often constrained by the assumed pedigree structures, and by the assumption that individuals not specified as related have independent genetic data.  In reality, extended multi-generation pedigrees cannot be validated from genetic data on extant individuals, and any given pedigree can give rise to a wide variation of genetic descent patterns.
     
    Modern genetic data allow for the detection of this co-ancestry at specific genome locations, and it is this co-ancestry of DNA that provides a direct measure of genomic diversity. Recently, primarily in human genetics, numerous methods for the detection of segments of genome sharing between pairs of individuals have been developed.   However, combining these inferences into realized structures of the changing genome sharing across a chromosome jointly among multiple individuals has proven challenging.  I will discuss a new approach to this problem, and show how, even if only pairwise estimates are desired, joint inference provides improved estimates.


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Events
Biology, BSRC

  • 06-07-2015 at 12-15 - Academic, Meeting, Seminar
    Summer of V's: Veracity
    Professor PETER CHRISTEN (Australian National University) and others
    Gateway Building, Lecture Room 4

    06-07-2015 at 12-15 - Academic, Meeting, Seminar
    Summer of V's: Veracity

    Professor PETER CHRISTEN (Australian National University) and others
    Gateway Building, Lecture Room 4

    The Summer of Vs meetings cover the Four Vs of Data Science - Veracity, Variety, Velocity and Volume - and are explicitly aimed at all Faculties of the University. Everyone is welcome to attend one, all or any number of meetings. Attendance is free. Meetings begin with a free buffet lunch, then a talk from a prestigious invited speaker, followed by contributions from local researchers.

    further details

    prebooking: Yes
    audience: All staff and students, Alumni, Public
    contact: Dr Daniel Barker




  • 06-07-2015 at 09-00 - Academic, Conference, Meeting
    THIRD INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL 'OMICS SYNTHESIS CONFERENCE
    The IEOS Conference Organising Committee
    University of St Andrews

    06-07-2015 at 09-00 - Academic, Conference, Meeting
    THIRD INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL 'OMICS SYNTHESIS CONFERENCE

    The IEOS Conference Organising Committee
    University of St Andrews

    The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and organisations from a range of disciplines with shared interests in the development of new approaches for data handling, generation and analysis in environmental omics. It is our hope is that the resulting interaction and exchange of ideas will lead to novel approaches, new collaborations and the consolidation of a wider integrated environmental ‘omics community.

    <p>ABSTRACT (TALK) and REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 6 June 2015 Science areas include bioinformatics, DNA-barcoding, genomics, metagenomics, metabarcoding, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, epigenetics, evolutionary and ecological omics, phylogenetics, study of ancient DNA and anthropology, new tools, resources and training--as applied to the study of the natural environment and environmentally relevant organisms and systems. We hope the resulting interactions and exchange of ideas will lead to novel approaches, new collaborations and the consolidation of a wider integrated environmental &lsquo;omics community. Keynote speakers are Professor Elizabeth Thompson from the University of Washington, Professor Mark Blaxter from the University of Edinburgh, and Professor Barbara Meth&eacute;, J Craig Ventor Institute. Invited speakers include Dr Logan Kistler from the University of Warwick, Dr Umer Zeeshan Ijaz from the University of Glasgow, and Dr Nathan Bailey from the University of St Andrews.</p>

    further details

    prebooking: Yes
    audience: All staff and students, Public
    contact: Thomas Meagher




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